Can malaria and dengue happen together?

Do dengue and malaria have a chance of coexisting?
Yes, it is possible for dengue and malaria to coexist. Vivax and falciparum malaria frequently coexist with dengue. It should be noted that their coexistence might cause serious problems. As a result, the diagnosis must be made quickly, and treatment must not be delayed.

Last Updated on January 18, 2023 by Shabnam Sengupta

The lives of numerous Indians across the nation are seriously threatened by dengue and malaria, two serious public health concerns. According to the WHO, the number of cases of malaria-related deaths has been rising annually, and dengue has been identified as one of the most dangerous and quickly spreading viral diseases carried by mosquitoes in the world. Hence, this write-up emphasizes the likelihood of their coexistence, distinctive symptoms, and prevention.

Is it possible for malaria and dengue to coexist?

Both malaria and dengue are transmitted by mosquito bites. The Anopheles mosquito, which bites a victim, transmits malaria, whereas the Aedes mosquito transmits dengue. However, a person’s body could harbour both illnesses. Even though it’s unusual, it’s not impossible. A patient may have both dengue fever and malaria.

 There are two types of malaria that can coexist with dengue. With vivax malaria, dengue can be easily controlled with fewer complications. However, if falciparum malaria develops with dengue, the complications could be serious. Malaria and dengue fever are both serious illnesses. Together, they may make the situation worse.

Malaria treatment is administered if a patient tests positive for both dengue and malaria. Patients with dengue do not need to be given any antibiotics; only supportive care is needed. Malaria must be controlled and treated, and the patient must be protected from any further complications when both diseases co-occur.

What Are the Various Symptoms of Malaria and Dengue?

The single-celled parasite Plasmodium, which causes malaria, is spread by the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. Malaria symptoms typically appear 15 days after the mosquito bite. Contrarily, the Aedes mosquito, which is the carrier of dengue, also spreads the disease through a mosquito bite. Typically, in the early morning or at dusk, these mosquitoes bite and spread the blood of people who have the dengue virus, which is how the disease is spread.

Although both malaria and dengue are diseases spread by mosquitoes, there are some key distinctions between the two.

Fever, chills, headaches, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, and fatigue are the main malarial symptoms. While the primary symptoms of dengue are a high fever, fatigue, nausea, eye pain, muscular pain, swollen glands, and occasionally rashes.

How should the two conditions be prevented?

With the use of prescribed medications and total rest, most people recover from malaria and dengue. Moreover, in order to reduce their risk of contracting these deadly diseases, the neighbourhood, keep their food and water covered, use mosquito repellents or nets, and keep themselves clean and well-washed at all times, especially if they are walking through flooded streets.

Disclaimer: Medical Science is an ever evolving field. We strive to keep this page updated. In case you notice any discrepancy in the content, please inform us at [email protected]. You can futher read our Correction Policy here. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website or it's social media channels. Read our Full Disclaimer Here for further information.

Disclaimer
Medical Science is an ever evolving field. We strive to keep this page updated. In case you notice any discrepancy in the content, please inform us at [email protected]. You can further read our Correction Policy here. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website or it's social media channels. Read our Full Disclaimer Here for further information.

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