Are carrots good for diabetes?

Yes. Carrots are a good choice if you have diabetes and are monitoring your blood sugar levels. They’re also non-starchy vegetables. 

Blood sugar or blood glucose, comes from the food you eat. When food is digested, your body creates blood sugar that circulates in your bloodstream. Blood sugar is used for energy. The sugar that isn’t needed to fuel your body right away gets stored in cells for later use.

The (GI) Glycemic Index rates how much certain foods raise your blood glucose. It is a scale that ranks carbohydrates from 0 to 100. The higher a food’s number, the faster it raises your blood sugar level. Low GI foods release sugar slowly into your body, giving it more time to store or use it. Your body digests foods that rate high on the scale faster than low ones. High GI foods have a rating of 70-100, medium GI foods have a rating of 55-69 and low GI foods are 55 or below.

The GI of raw carrots is 16. The GI for boiled carrots ranges from 32 to 49 that puts carrots in the low glycemic food group. Hence, carrots have a very little impact on blood sugar. Also, Carrots are high in fiber, that helps slow down how quickly they release the sugar.

Glycemic load is the measure that combines the glycemic index and the serving size to determine the overall effect on your blood sugar. Eating low glycemic index food might raise the glycemic load. Hence, it is important to keep a check on glycemic load also. Two small raw carrots have a glycemic load of about 8. That also puts carrots in the low glycemic load group.

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Disclaimer
Medical Science is an ever evolving field. We strive to keep this page updated. In case you notice any discrepancy in the content, please inform us at [email protected]. You can further read our Correction Policy here. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website or it's social media channels. Read our Full Disclaimer Here for further information.

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